Skip to Content

MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience

News

August 25, 2016

This message brings news about:

A) Recent or Forthcoming Neurolaw Publications
B) Neurolaw Media & News Clippings
C) Conferences & Speaker Series
D) Other Developments 

 

 A.  Recent or Forthcoming Neurolaw Publications

 

    1. Francis X. Shen, Neurolegislation: How U.S. Legislators are Using Brain Science , 29 Harv. J. L. & Tech. 495 (2016).          

 

    1. Matthew Ginther, Neuroscience or Neurospeculation? Peer Commentary on Four Articles Examining the Prevalence of Neuroscience in Criminal Cases Around the World , J. L. & Biosciences (2016).

 

    1. Francis X. Shen, Neuroscientific Evidence as Instant Reply , J. L. & Biosciences (2016).

 

    1. Stephen Morse, Law and Sciences of the Brain/Mind , Oxford Handbook on L. & Reg. of Tech. (forthcoming 2016).

 

    1. Joshua W. Buckholtz, Valerie F. Reyna, & Christopher Slobogin, A Neuro-Legal Lingua Franca: Bridging Law and Neuroscience on the Issue of Self-Control , Mental Health L. & Policy J. (forthcoming 2016).

 

    1. Stephen J. Morse, Actions Speak Louder Than Images: The Use of Neuroscientific Evidence in Criminal Cases , J. L. & Biosciences (2016).        

 

    1. Ed Johnston, Brain Scanning and Lie Detectors: The Implications for Fundamental Defence Rights , 22 European Journal of Current Legal Issues 2: Special Issue on Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience (2016).

 

    1. Hannah Wishart, Young Minds, Old Legal Problems: Can Neuroscience Fill the Void? 22 European Journal of Current Legal Issues 2: Special Issue on Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience (2016). 

 

    1. Lisa Claydon & Caroline Rödiger, Fear, Loss of Control and Cognitive Neuroscience , 22 European Journal of Current Legal Issues 2: Special Issue on Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience (2016).

 

    1. Elizabeth Shaw, Psychopathy, Moral Understanding and Criminal Responsibility , 22 European Journal of Current Legal Issues 2: Special Issue on Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience (2016).

 

    1. Paul Catley, The Future of Neurolaw , 22 European Journal of Current Legal Issues 2: Special Issue on Criminal Responsibility and Neuroscience (2016).

 

    1. Zachary E. Shapiro, Truth, Deceit, and Neuroimaging: Can Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Serve as a Technology-Based Method of Lie Detection? 29 Harv. J. L. & Tech. 527 (2016).

 

    1. Jennifer S. Bard, “Ah Yes, I Remember It Well”: Why the Inherent Unreliability of Human Memory Makes Brain Imaging Technology a Poor Measure of Truth-Telling in the Courtroom , 94 Or. L. Rev. 295 (2016).

 

    1. Andreas Kuersten & Roy H. Hamilton, Minding the ‘Gaps’ in the Federal Regulation of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Devices , J. L. & Biosciences 1-9 (2016).

 

    1. Manish A. Fozdar, The Relevance of Modern Neuroscience to Forensic Psychiatry Practice , 44(2) J. Am. Acad. of Psychiatry & L. 145 (2016).

 

    1. Adam D. Moore, Privacy, Neuroscience, and Neuro-Surveillance , 7(7) L. & Neuroscience eJournal (2016).

           

    1. Ana Nordberg, Defining Human Enhancement: Towards a Foundational Conceptual Tool for Enhancement Law , 7(7) L. & Neuroscience eJournal (2016).

 

    1. Aleksandra Matuszewski, The Mistaken Emphasis on Organic Brain Damage in Capital Habeas Litigation , 67 Ala. L. Rev. 1217 (2016).      

 

    1. Karolina Sörman, John F. Edens, Shannon Toney Smith, John W. Clark, Marianne Kristiansson, Olof Svensson, Boldness and its Relation to Psychopathic Personality: Prototypicality Analyses Among Forensic Mental Health, Criminal Justice, and Layperson Raters , 40(3) L. & Human Behavior 337 (2016).

 

    1. Jules Epstein & Suzanne Mannes, “Gruesome” Evidence, Science, and Rule 403 , The Judicial Edge, The National Judicial College (2016).

 

    1. Sarah James, Ringing the Bell for the Last Time: How the NFL's Settlement Agreement Overwhelmingly Disfavors NFL Players Living with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) , 11 J. Health & Biomedical L. 391 (2016).

 

    1. Stacey Wood & Bhushan S. Agharkar, Traumatic Brain Injury in Criminal Litigation , 84 UMKC L. Rev. 411 (2015).

 

    1. Ian J. Cosgrove, The Illusive “Reasonable Person”: Can Neuroscience Help the Mentally Disabled? 91 Notre Dame L. Rev. 421 (2015).         

 

    1. John B. Meixner Jr., The Use of Neuroscience Evidence in Criminal Proceedings , J. L. & Biosciences (2016).   

 

    1. Govind Persad, Law, Science, and the Injured Mind , 67(4) Ala. L. Rev. 1179 (2016).

 

    1. Helena Morão, Neuroethics and Criminal Responsibility - A Criminal Law Comment on Neil Levy's Consciousness and Moral Responsibility , 3 J. L. & Crime Sciences (forthcoming 2016).

 

 B.  Neurolaw Media & News Clippings

    1. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: “As science plays an ever increasing role in policy decisions, the Committee on Preparing the Next Generation of Policy Makers for Science-Based Decisions, an ad hoc committee under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Committee on Science, Technology, and Law (CSTL), has overseen the development of educational modules  that elucidate the role of science in decision-making for professional school students, with a particular emphasis on scientific and statistical methods of inference.”  For more information, click here .

    2. Teaching Prison Inmates About Their Own Brain Trauma Could Help Them Rehabilitate: Newsweek recently published a piece titled “Teaching Prison Inmates About Their Own Brain Trauma Could Help Them Rehabilitate.” To read the article, click here .

    3. Australian Neurolaw: Elsevier SciTech Connect recently published a piece titled “My Brain Made Me Do It: Will Neuroscience Change the Way We Punish Criminals?” which addresses advances in Australian neurolaw. To read the article, click here . To visit the Australian Neurolaw Database, click here .

 C.  Conferences & Speaker Series  

    1. 2016 Mortimer D. Sackler, M.D. Summer Institute: The 2016 Mortimer D. Sackler, M.D. Summer Institute was held July 11 to 15, 2016 on Manhattan’s beautiful Upper East Side and was directed by Dr. BJ Casey and Ali Cohen of the Sackler Institute at Weill Cornell Medical College. This year’s course focused on law and neuroscience specifically as it relates to juvenile justice reform, racial bias and lie detection. Participants benefited from lectures and from direct interactions with neuroscientists, psychologists and legal scholars during both social and scientific events scheduled each day. For more information, click here .

        

D.  Other Developments

    1. Tenured or Tenure-Track Opening: Georgia State University College of Law seeks applicants for one openrank tenured or tenure-track position beginning Fall 2017. Having already appointed two exceptional candidates with expertise in Law and Neuroscience (“Neurolaw”) – one in psychology, one in philosophy – Georgia State now seeks to appoint a third scholar with expertise in this field. To qualify for appointment in the College of Law candidates must hold the JD degree at the time of application, and demonstrate a record of excellence in teaching and research. The successful applicant will play a key role in building the university’s Neuroethics/Neurolaw Program, and so a commitment to interdisciplinary collaboration with other relevant departments is critical. Applicants should send a letter of interest, including research statement and a CV with a list of references, directly to the chair of the search committee, William A. Edmundson, at wedmundson@gsu.edu. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Georgia State, a research university of the University System of Georgia, is committed to serving a diverse student body, and is an AA/EEO Employer. Qualified women and minority candidates are especially encouraged to apply. The College seeks diversity. Offer of employment will be conditional on background check.

  

       

Neurolaw News is produced by The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience, headquartered at Vanderbilt University Law School, 131 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203.  For more information, please see: < http://www.lawneuro.org/ >.  For phone inquiries, please call 615-343-9797.

To UNSUBSCRIBE or to SUBSCRIBE: send an email to Executive Assistant Sarah Grove at < sarah.e.grove@vanderbilt.edu > with either “Unsubscribe” or “Subscribe” in the subject line.  To access the Neurolaw News archives, visit http://www.lawneuro.org/listserv.php#archives


News